CS Experience at Wheaton

One of the most rewarding parts of a computer science major's experience at Wheaton is the quality of his or her peers. In addition to dazzling wizardry in assigned projects in courses, computer science majors at Wheaton embark on their own projects using the latest technology.

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But the exciting things they do are not just with computers. Computer science majors at Wheaton represent a vast array of interests. They have second majors in mathematics, chemistry, physics, archaeology, English, German, and communications. They play in jazz bands, play the bag pipes, play semi-professional football, spend semesters abroad, and work on hybrid cars.

  • Eric Raymond said, "Every good work of software starts by scratching a developer's personal itch." Seniors DrewCampus app Hannay, Alisa Maas, and Andrew Wolfe, like many computer science students, had just such an itch; they wanted access to the campus student directory on the go. After the fall semester of their sophomore year, Drew, Alisa, and Andrew began to dig into the Android platform and created a useful tool for the campus to use. The trio produced an app that not only searches the campus student directory, but also lets users view the daily menus of the dining hall and open hours of the underclass dormitories, among other things. The application proved so popular that it reached over 100 downloads by word of mouth alone.
    The app is available at the Android website >>
  • John Charles Bauschatz '12 came to Wheaton to study archaeolgy, but he quickly got bit by the programming bug (not the kind that appears as mistakes in code). John Charles enjoys working on software that supports his other interests. When he began learning to play the guitar he realized how useful a computer program to compute chords and fingerings would be, so he wrote one that exhaustively computes how to produce chords on a guitar fretboard. Later, while taking biblical Hebrew, he wrote a program to quiz a user on Hebrew vocabulary and morphology. As John Charles knows,one of the most fulling parts of a project is that if the developer finds them useful, it's likely that someone else will, too.
  • Brothers Chris Ewert '05 and Andrew Ewert '09 graduated from Wheaton with degrees in Computer Science. Now they work on coverting hybrid vehicles into plug-in hybrid vehicles which can be recharged from an external power source such as the electrical grid. These cars plug in and fully charge while not in use, after which they can drive for the first 20-30 miles purely on electricity. Chris and Andrew work on designing the components that allow aftermaker conversions from hybrid to plug-in hybrid without damaging the car or the batteries. They have been able to get their Toyota Prius up to 70 MPH on electric drive alone---something that had not been done previously with this model.

But the exciting things they do are not just with computers. Computer science majors at Wheaton represent a vast array of interests. They have second majors in mathematics, chemistry, physics, archaeology, English, German, and communications. They play in jazz bands, play the bag pipes, play semi-professional football, spend semesters abroad, and work on hybrid cars.

  • Eric Raymond said, "Every good work of software starts by scratching a developer's personal itch." Seniors DrewCampus app Hannay, Alisa Maas, and Andrew Wolfe, like many computer science students, had just such an itch; they wanted access to the campus student directory on the go. After the fall semester of their sophomore year, Drew, Alisa, and Andrew began to dig into the Android platform and created a useful tool for the campus to use. The trio produced an app that not only searches the campus student directory, but also lets users view the daily menus of the dining hall and open hours of the underclass dormitories, among other things. The application proved so popular that it reached over 100 downloads by word of mouth alone.
    The app is available at the Android website >>
  • John Charles Bauschatz '12 came to Wheaton to study archaeolgy, but he quickly got bit by the programming bug (not the kind that appears as mistakes in code). John Charles enjoys working on software that supports his other interests. When he began learning to play the guitar he realized how useful a computer program to compute chords and fingerings would be, so he wrote one that exhaustively computes how to produce chords on a guitar fretboard. Later, while taking biblical Hebrew, he wrote a program to quiz a user on Hebrew vocabulary and morphology. As John Charles knows,one of the most fulling parts of a project is that if the developer finds them useful, it's likely that someone else will, too.
  • Brothers Chris Ewert '05 and Andrew Ewert '09 graduated from Wheaton with degrees in Computer Science. Now they work on coverting hybrid vehicles into plug-in hybrid vehicles which can be recharged from an external power source such as the electrical grid. These cars plug in and fully charge while not in use, after which they can drive for the first 20-30 miles purely on electricity. Chris and Andrew work on designing the components that allow aftermaker conversions from hybrid to plug-in hybrid without damaging the car or the batteries. They have been able to get their Toyota Prius up to 70 MPH on electric drive alone---something that had not been done previously with this model.