Minors and Mini-minors

Many students have interest in computer science along side of many other things and do not have the time in their schedules for a major.

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Computer Systems

This track is for home-grown hackers who want more insight into how to play around with their Linux boxes. It contains the courses for computer systems and organization, skipping the math stuff.

  • CSCI 235 Programming I: Problem-Solving
  • CSCI 245 Programming II: Object-Oriented Design
  • CSCI 351 Introduction to Computer Systems

12 hours total.

You may also be interested in CSCI 445 (Operating Systems), though that course has more in the way of prerequisites.

Just Plain Programming

Computer science is much more than programming. However, some students may be interested primarily in getting background in designing and coding small and large pieces of software. This combination of courses may be for you. Although these courses form the backbone of the learning the craft of programming within the computer science major, plenty of information about the rest of the field of computer science is woven throughout them as well.

  • CSCI 235 Programming I: Problem-Solving
  • CSCI 245 Programming II: Object-Oriented Design
  • CSCI 215 Web Design and Programming
  • CSCI 243 Discrete Mathematics and Functional Programming
  • CSCI 335 Software Development

18 hours total.

(If you wanted to add one more course to this slate, CSCI 345 (Data Structures and Algorithms) would be the best choice.)

Computer Science Concepts

If you simply want to know what the field of computer science is (how it differs from, say, information technology or just programming), this track will expose you to the main ideas of the discipline with minimal time commitment. CSCI 231 discusses how computer systems work and takes a look at various applications of computing; CSCI 243 presents the mathematical foundations with a bit of programming.

  • CSCI 231 Computer Science Concepts
  • CSCI 243 Discrete Mathematics and Functional Programming.

If these courses make you want to learn more, then the introductory programming sequence (CSCI 235 and CSCI 245, Programming I & II) would be a great next step.

6 hours total.

Track to take CSCI 445

For math majors and economics majors who are interested in computer science, your goal should be to take the course CSCI 445 (Analysis of Algorithms), which is our premiere course on computer science theory. This is the most mathematical course, and many of its concepts tie nicely into economic theory (amortization, network flow). Since CSCI 445 is an advanced course, there is a fairly long prerequisite chain to work through:

  • CSCI 235 Programming I
  • CSCI 245 Programming II
  • CSCI 243 Discrete Math and Functional Programming (may also be taken concurrently with the above courses)
  • CSCI 345 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSCI 445 Analysis of Algorithms

If you do not have time in your schedule to complete the entire track, taking just through CSCI 345 will give you a fair amount of the benefit.

20 hours total.

Computer Systems

This track is for home-grown hackers who want more insight into how to play around with their Linux boxes. It contains the courses for computer systems and organization, skipping the math stuff.

  • CSCI 235 Programming I: Problem-Solving
  • CSCI 245 Programming II: Object-Oriented Design
  • CSCI 351 Introduction to Computer Systems

12 hours total.

You may also be interested in CSCI 445 (Operating Systems), though that course has more in the way of prerequisites.

Just Plain Programming

Computer science is much more than programming. However, some students may be interested primarily in getting background in designing and coding small and large pieces of software. This combination of courses may be for you. Although these courses form the backbone of the learning the craft of programming within the computer science major, plenty of information about the rest of the field of computer science is woven throughout them as well.

  • CSCI 235 Programming I: Problem-Solving
  • CSCI 245 Programming II: Object-Oriented Design
  • CSCI 215 Web Design and Programming
  • CSCI 243 Discrete Mathematics and Functional Programming
  • CSCI 335 Software Development

18 hours total.

(If you wanted to add one more course to this slate, CSCI 345 (Data Structures and Algorithms) would be the best choice.)

Computer Science Concepts

If you simply want to know what the field of computer science is (how it differs from, say, information technology or just programming), this track will expose you to the main ideas of the discipline with minimal time commitment. CSCI 231 discusses how computer systems work and takes a look at various applications of computing; CSCI 243 presents the mathematical foundations with a bit of programming.

  • CSCI 231 Computer Science Concepts
  • CSCI 243 Discrete Mathematics and Functional Programming.

If these courses make you want to learn more, then the introductory programming sequence (CSCI 235 and CSCI 245, Programming I & II) would be a great next step.

6 hours total.

Track to take CSCI 445

For math majors and economics majors who are interested in computer science, your goal should be to take the course CSCI 445 (Analysis of Algorithms), which is our premiere course on computer science theory. This is the most mathematical course, and many of its concepts tie nicely into economic theory (amortization, network flow). Since CSCI 445 is an advanced course, there is a fairly long prerequisite chain to work through:

  • CSCI 235 Programming I
  • CSCI 245 Programming II
  • CSCI 243 Discrete Math and Functional Programming (may also be taken concurrently with the above courses)
  • CSCI 345 Data Structures and Algorithms
  • CSCI 445 Analysis of Algorithms

If you do not have time in your schedule to complete the entire track, taking just through CSCI 345 will give you a fair amount of the benefit.

20 hours total.