Chee-Chiew Lee, Ph.D. 2010

Menu

Chee-Chiew Lee

Recipient of the Hansen Endowed Fellowship

Associate Professor of New Testament
School of Theology, Chinese

Singapore Bible College, Singapore

My dissertation, published by Pickwick, “The Blessing of Abraham and the Promise of the Spirit: The Influence of the Prophets on Paul in Galatians 3:1–14” (supervised by Dr. Douglas Moo), investigates the relationship between the blessing of Abraham and the Spirit in Gal 3:1–14 and its significance for reading Galatians and Paul’s doctrine of justification. This study shows that, in accordance with the prophetic tradition regarding the Spirit, Paul understands the Spirit as the evidence of receiving the blessing of Abraham and the means of perpetuating the blessing. This interpretation sheds light on the integral connection between the “doctrinal” and “ethical” sections of the letter to the Galatians (Galatians 1–4 and 5–6). The former sets forth the principle of justification by faith with the reception of the Spirit as the evidence of justification. The latter elucidates how believers must rely on the Spirit of Christ by faith, because it is by the Spirit’s work in the believer’s life that the status of justification is maintained and guaranteed for final vindication.

My learning experience at Wheaton has been rich and fruitful in many ways. Wheaton College’s Ph.D. program brings together a unique combination of interdisciplinary studies, rigorous scholarship, and a deep concern for the edification of the church through biblical studies and theological reflection. It has been a privilege for me to work with and learn from the faculty, who are both fine scholars and godly individuals. All these have been essential in shaping me to be a more effective theological educator in the Majority World. I especially appreciate the opportunity to commence dissertation work at the beginning of the program, which is an important factor for me to complete the program in good time. I am also grateful for the tuition scholarship and fellowship stipend, which contributed significantly to making my doctoral studies a reality. As I return to Singapore, my home country, to serve, fond memories of my time of learning and spiritual growth with the faculty, the staff, and fellow students at Wheaton will always move me to give thanks.

Chee-Chiew Lee

Recipient of the Hansen Endowed Fellowship

Associate Professor of New Testament
School of Theology, Chinese

Singapore Bible College, Singapore

My dissertation, published by Pickwick, “The Blessing of Abraham and the Promise of the Spirit: The Influence of the Prophets on Paul in Galatians 3:1–14” (supervised by Dr. Douglas Moo), investigates the relationship between the blessing of Abraham and the Spirit in Gal 3:1–14 and its significance for reading Galatians and Paul’s doctrine of justification. This study shows that, in accordance with the prophetic tradition regarding the Spirit, Paul understands the Spirit as the evidence of receiving the blessing of Abraham and the means of perpetuating the blessing. This interpretation sheds light on the integral connection between the “doctrinal” and “ethical” sections of the letter to the Galatians (Galatians 1–4 and 5–6). The former sets forth the principle of justification by faith with the reception of the Spirit as the evidence of justification. The latter elucidates how believers must rely on the Spirit of Christ by faith, because it is by the Spirit’s work in the believer’s life that the status of justification is maintained and guaranteed for final vindication.

My learning experience at Wheaton has been rich and fruitful in many ways. Wheaton College’s Ph.D. program brings together a unique combination of interdisciplinary studies, rigorous scholarship, and a deep concern for the edification of the church through biblical studies and theological reflection. It has been a privilege for me to work with and learn from the faculty, who are both fine scholars and godly individuals. All these have been essential in shaping me to be a more effective theological educator in the Majority World. I especially appreciate the opportunity to commence dissertation work at the beginning of the program, which is an important factor for me to complete the program in good time. I am also grateful for the tuition scholarship and fellowship stipend, which contributed significantly to making my doctoral studies a reality. As I return to Singapore, my home country, to serve, fond memories of my time of learning and spiritual growth with the faculty, the staff, and fellow students at Wheaton will always move me to give thanks.