James Gordon, Ph.D.

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Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy
On Faculty since 2014

Phone: (630)752-5817
Fax: (630)752-5581
Email:

Education

Ph.D., Wheaton College (Biblical and Theological Studies), 2015

M.A., Philosophy of Religion, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 2011

B.A., Philosophy, University of Michigan, 2008


About James Gordon

I began to develop an interest in philosophy during my undergraduate studies. At the time, I thought philosophy’s primary value was as a tool to help me defend the Christian faith through the use of apologetics and proofs for God’s existence. While it certainly is valuable in this regard, it was not until my graduate studies that I realized philosophy had much to contribute to our understanding of the Christian faith in a positive sense. Philosophy, in other words, was not only defensive in posture but could help us make sense of the things we already believed by faith to be true.

To that end, I wrote my Ph.D. dissertation at Wheaton College on the intersection of Scripture’s teaching and philosophy’s understanding of the doctrine of the incarnation. I continue to be interested in how the tools of philosophical traditions shed light on Christian doctrines like the Trinity, original sin, and the atonement. I am asked whether I am a philosopher or a theologian, but I see no contradiction in being both.

I am also deeply interested in the philosophical, theological, and sociological issues surrounding our views of food and eating. Meals have a rich significance as one of the primary things that make us human, and reflection on what our eating practices tell us about ourselves and about God is very important.

I love teaching students at Wheaton College because of their love for learning, their seriousness about life, and their gracious and caring demeanor. Wheaton students ask thoughtful questions that challenge my ways of thinking and make me want to search for honest and faithful answers alongside of them.

Courses Taught

  • Introduction to Philosophy
  • Introduction to Logic

Research

  • Metaphysics of the Incarnation
  • Analytic Theology
  • Scholastic Metaphysics
  • Philosophy and Theology of Food and Eating

Papers Published

  • “A ‘Glaring Misunderstanding’? Barth, Schleiermacher, and the Nature of Speculative Theology,” International Journal of Systematic Theology 16 (2014): 313- 30.
  • “Is It Possible and Desirable for Theologians to Speculate After Barth?,” Heythrop Journal (Forthcoming).

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