Carl F.H. Henry

Menu

Carl F(erdinand) H(oward) Henry, (1913-2003), journalist, theologian, editor, was born in New York City. Educated at Wheaton College, Northern Baptist Seminary, and Boston University, Henry was a towering figure within the neo-evangelical movement. He helped found the National Association of Evangelicals (1942), Fuller Theological Seminary (1947), and was the first editor of the evangelical magazine Christianity Today (1956-68). Henry desired to rescue conservative evangelicalism from the hands of fundamentalism, and in 1947 he published his controversial work, The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism, where he argued for evangelicals to develop a worldview which included social and political dimensions. In addition to these accomplishments, Henry is perhaps best known as a theologian who emphasized propositional truth as developed in his six-volume theological work, God, Revelation and Authority (1976-83).

For further reading see J.D. Woodbridge, ‘Carl F.H. Henry: Spokesperson for American Evangelicalism’, in D.A. Carson and J.D. Woodbridge, eds., God and Culture: Essays in Honor of Carl F.H Henry (Eerdmans, 1993); Bob E. Patterson, Carl F. H. Henry (Hendrickson, 1983). 

Carl F(erdinand) H(oward) Henry, (1913-2003), journalist, theologian, editor, was born in New York City. Educated at Wheaton College, Northern Baptist Seminary, and Boston University, Henry was a towering figure within the neo-evangelical movement. He helped found the National Association of Evangelicals (1942), Fuller Theological Seminary (1947), and was the first editor of the evangelical magazine Christianity Today (1956-68). Henry desired to rescue conservative evangelicalism from the hands of fundamentalism, and in 1947 he published his controversial work, The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism, where he argued for evangelicals to develop a worldview which included social and political dimensions. In addition to these accomplishments, Henry is perhaps best known as a theologian who emphasized propositional truth as developed in his six-volume theological work, God, Revelation and Authority (1976-83).

For further reading see J.D. Woodbridge, ‘Carl F.H. Henry: Spokesperson for American Evangelicalism’, in D.A. Carson and J.D. Woodbridge, eds., God and Culture: Essays in Honor of Carl F.H Henry (Eerdmans, 1993); Bob E. Patterson, Carl F. H. Henry (Hendrickson, 1983).