Solidarity Cabinet

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Sammy Mallow

Graduation Year: 2016

Hometown: Banlung, Cambodia

Major: Geology

Why Solidarity? I love the beauty of unity and diversity in the body of Christ.

About Me: I am biracial, white and Asian, and my parents have lived in Cambodia since before I was born. My mom’s family moved from Cambodia to Chicago in 1981 to escape the Khmer Rouge regime. My dad grew up in Kansas City, MO and attended dental school in Chicago. They met at a multiethnic church in Uptown and moved back to Cambodia where my family currently resides. I learned Khmer and English at the same time growing up and am fluent in both.

What would you like to achieve from being on Solidarity this year? A community spirit that celebrates differences and listens to and supports those who have been alienated.

What is one lesson of racial reconciliation that you’ve recently learned and want to share with our community? Racial reconciliation is hard and can only be achieved with love.

If someone was just starting to think about issues of race, what advice would you give them? Have an open mind and recognize that there is no magic formula to fix racial issues.

How has the community of Wheaton impacted you? It’s a double deal. The Wheaton community has frustrated me tremendously because of its fear and lack of love when it comes to racial issues. At the same time, the Wheaton community has loved me deeply and rejuvenated my passion to speed God’s Kingdom on earth.

When you’re not studying or working on projects, where can we find you on campus? Fischer 5E

What would you do at Wheaton if you had more time? Photograph Chicago.

Graduation Year: 2016

Hometown: Banlung, Cambodia

Major: Geology

Why Solidarity? I love the beauty of unity and diversity in the body of Christ.

About Me: I am biracial, white and Asian, and my parents have lived in Cambodia since before I was born. My mom’s family moved from Cambodia to Chicago in 1981 to escape the Khmer Rouge regime. My dad grew up in Kansas City, MO and attended dental school in Chicago. They met at a multiethnic church in Uptown and moved back to Cambodia where my family currently resides. I learned Khmer and English at the same time growing up and am fluent in both.

What would you like to achieve from being on Solidarity this year? A community spirit that celebrates differences and listens to and supports those who have been alienated.

What is one lesson of racial reconciliation that you’ve recently learned and want to share with our community? Racial reconciliation is hard and can only be achieved with love.

If someone was just starting to think about issues of race, what advice would you give them? Have an open mind and recognize that there is no magic formula to fix racial issues.

How has the community of Wheaton impacted you? It’s a double deal. The Wheaton community has frustrated me tremendously because of its fear and lack of love when it comes to racial issues. At the same time, the Wheaton community has loved me deeply and rejuvenated my passion to speed God’s Kingdom on earth.

When you’re not studying or working on projects, where can we find you on campus? Fischer 5E

What would you do at Wheaton if you had more time? Photograph Chicago.