#MyWheaton

From Chi-town to Qui-town: My Medical Internship Experience

Posted July 27, 2016 by Tuesday A. Whittington ’17

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student-ministry-partners-quito-wheaton-collegeAs I begin writing this blog post, I suppose it’d be best to tell you why I decided to do Wheaton’s Student Ministry Partners (SMP) program in the first place. To be honest, the way it began was with a search to find a dependable living situation for the end of the school year. Though I grew up in a loving home with a wonderful single mother and five amazing siblings, living situations since high school have unfortunately been difficult to depend on; so I began with this goal in mind when applying for the SMP program as well as others.

My interest in the SMP program was solidified when I heard from a fellow student that this was “hands down” some of the best medical experience she had ever come across in her time at Wheaton. As an applied health science major and with these recommendations in mind, this trip to Quito, Ecuador seemed to be the perfect option.

I prayed, interviewed, waited, and was accepted. God’s work is truly marvelous in my eyes.

The places we have seen and incredible teachers we have had here--from doctors, nurses, and physical therapists to our supervisor Mika--could not have been more masterfully orchestrated. The best part about this trip for me has been getting to watch at least 12 surgeries in the course of 3 weeks. Although I’ve always had an interest in surgery, I have now seen this interest matched with a forward-looking desire for more exposure to this field of medicine. Not only this, but I have been able to work in a children’s hospital shadowing nurses and doctors as they provide emergency care for suffering children.

For Wheaton’s work in preparing us to come to Quito, I am incredibly grateful. Being abundantly provided with prayers, seminars, sessions with our teams, as well as wonderful direction and mentorship from a student who has done the exact same program made each of my teammates and I feel equipped and excited to come and experience the incredible hospitals and clinics Quito has to offer. Even with the challenges in hearing about attacks back home in the States and what friends and family are having to deal with as we are abroad, we have all loved each other well and cared for and spoken to one another carefully and honestly. That was without a doubt an answer to my prayers before coming here to Quito.

I can only hope future Wheaton students have the experiences that I have had working with Living and Learning International here with my team in Quito, Ecuador. I will never forget my experiences here. I am loving every day and hoping to see more converts from Chicagoans to Chiquitoans. 

#MyWheaton #ChiQuito

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Tuesday A. Whittington ’17 is a senior studying applied health science at Wheaton. She is currently participating in Wheaton’s Student Ministry Partners program in Quito, Ecuador. Photo captions (from top): Tuesday with fellow SMP interns in Quito; jumping for joy on their roof surrounded by mountains in Quito.

Global Urban Perspectives: Denver

Posted July 20, 2016 by Iliana Rivera '17

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global-urban-perspectives-denverThis summer, I am taking part in Wheaton’s Global Urban Perspectives program in Denver. In this program, students take on an internship and class for two months. My internship assignment is with the Restoration Outreach Program in Aurora, Colorado. Their mission statement is to meet needs, build relationships, and restore lives through Christ on East Colfax (street). Those who live in the area are usually refugees, single mothers, or the homeless. They are all from different religions, races, and ethnicities. 

At Restoration, I do a bit of everything. I help pack lunches for day camp, I tutor those striving to earn their GED degree, I help to prepare and count food in our food bank, and I provide times of prayer with visitors. On top of that, my main supervisor gives us lectures here and there about the missions field in Aurora. She has given us a first-hand account of how God has formed their ministry and provided for each member. In the future, I want to do something in the cross-cultural research field, so being able to be part of the East Colfax community is amazing! 

It took about a year’s worth of preparation before our group of GUP participants left campus to serve in Denver for the summer. Our preparation consisted of weekly meetings that ranged from professors speaking about mass incarceration to guest speakers who have experience in missions work to an awesome weekend retreat in Chicago. We also did lots of fundraising, community service, and group dynamic work. Most of us participating in GUP - Denver have different internship sites and have been expected to be as independent as possible, be it seeking transportation or buying groceries. Some people even pay for rent. It’s a great way to prepare for life after college! 

I chose to participate in the GUP program primarily because I wanted to physically serve somewhere outside of Illinois. I have a health condition that prevents me from doing a lot of physical tasks, but lately I have been doing better than usual. So, I wanted to give that strength back to God! GUP was the best way for me to do that. 

It is week eight in Denver for me now, and we have already gotten lost on the bus system, explored the mountains, met goats, and learned a ton! A highlight of my experience has been when my mom flew in as a surprise and I got to show her my internship site and my amazing friends. As part of GUP - Denver, I have been most excited to meet new people and just listen to their stories. You gain so much from that. 

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Iliana Rivera ’17 is a senior studying psychology. She is currently participating in Wheaton’s Global Urban Perspectives program in Denver. Photo captions (from top): GUP students at class in Denver, CO (Iliana in row 1, far left); on a hike at the top of Mt. Evans in Idaho Springs, CO.

Student Ministry Partners: Bethlehem

Posted July 12, 2016 by Jackie Westeren '19

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wheaton-college-palestinian-dinner-student-ministry-partnersWhen I heard Wheaton wanted to send a group of Student Ministry Partner (SMP) students to Bethlehem for the first time this summer, I immediately was interested because of the rich history, complicated and ongoing conflict, and a desire to better understand life in Arab culture. 

Now that our team of six students is here partnering with the Palestine Summer Encounter program at Holy Land Trust, an interfaith NGO that seeks peace and reconciliation in the Holy Land, we have experienced more learning and meaningful conversations than we ever could have imagined. 

On a typical day, after enjoying Arab breakfasts with our host families, we set off to service projects. They vary each week -- we have painted a YMCA building, taught English, worked with disabled youth, and farmed. We then spend the remainder of the day taking Arabic lessons, hearing lectures about the history of Israel/Palestine, doing cultural activities, or touring historical sites. 

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While all of these activities have taught us a lot, the most impactful part of our trip has been the relationships we have formed. The staff and participants at Holy Land Trust, our host families, and other people we have met living here have taught us more than a classroom ever could have. 

One such example was during our first week here when we were invited to a new friend’s grandmother's house for the afternoon. After a warm greeting from people we had never met, we were overwhelmed with hospitality, being offered cucumbers, tea, coffee, pita, and cookies. We felt incredibly welcomed into their home, and had hours worth of meaningful conversations about family life in Bethlehem and how the occupation and intifadas have personally affected their lives. They allowed us to enter into immensely emotional stories while also showering us with love and comfort—something that has sparked further conversation amongst our group that couldn't have happened in a classroom. 

It's also the simple encounters we have daily with shopkeepers inviting us to coffee, people buying us medical supplies and water when we fall in the street, and friendly faces who are genuine when they say they want to get to know us that make us realize that Bethlehem, and all of Palestine, is a place of incredibly kind people who teach us what hospitality and loving people well looks like. 

While many things we have seen and heard here have challenged us, we continue to seek truth and pray for peace. We are leaving in less than a month, and until then, we look forward to continuing to learn, serve, and see God at work by living side-by-side with our friends in Bethlehem who yearn for peace.

“Peace is not contemplation, but active hunger and thirst after righteousness.” -Abuna Elias Chacour 

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Jackie Westeren ’19 is an international relations major participating in Wheaton’s Student Ministry Partners project in Bethlehem this summer. Learn more about Student Ministry Partners on their website. Photo captions (from top): SMP participants cook a traditional Palestinian dish together; a view of Bethlehem; SMP students listen to Sami Adwan, co-director of the Peace Research Institute in the Middle East (PRIME) and professor at Bethlehem University, deliver a lecture.

My Internship at Samaritan’s Purse

Posted July 6, 2016 by Brielle Lisa '18

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“Mom! We have to go to the store right away! I want to get her a notebook and colored pencils!” 

Year after year I remember incessantly pestering my mother so I could go pick out toys for our Operation Christmas Child shoeboxes. That was my first exposure to Samaritan’s Purse.

My next exposure to Samaritan’s Purse was during fall of my freshman year at Wheaton, when representatives came to Wheaton’s campus to recruit for their internship program. That day, I made a mental note to apply for an internship during the following year. This past fall, I had my heart set on becoming a #SPintern

I was drawn to this internship for multiple reasons, first and foremost because Samaritan’s Purse not only meets people's physical, earthly needs, but also their spiritual, eternal needs. Samaritan’s Purse serves for Christ and His Kingdom.

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Throughout my application process, Wheaton’s Center of Vocation and Career reviewed my resume and cover letter, provided me with access to Big Interview (interactive online interview tutorials), and encouraged me each step of the way. 

Now I am almost halfway through my internship as an editorial intern in the Communications Department at Samaritan’s Purse’s International Headquarters in Boone, NC. I spend time writing, editing, researching, and marketing. One of the most exciting projects I am a part of is an Operation Christmas Child marketing campaign targeting 15-23 year olds. As part of the target demographic, I have been able to contribute a valuable perspective. I am also traveling to the Philippines as the lead writer for an Operation Christmas Child shoebox distribution in July—it is amazing how God orchestrates full circle stories.

I enjoy beginning every work day with staff devotions, a time when all 600 employees meet together; “grabbing meals” with my coworkers; hiking after work with fellow interns; and seeing familiar Wheaton faces as there are 11 other Wheaton students interning here, too! 

My goal for my internship is to learn as much as possible—about writing, editing, relief work, professionalism, people’s stories, and Christ’s call on my life. With that, I am thankful for all I have learned at Wheaton. My Christian liberal arts education teaches me to synthesize and think theologically. My professors teach me to show and not tell stories, to read critically, and to communicate clearly. The Wheaton student body, faculty, and staff teach me how to live in community. I get to use all these skills during my internship.

With the next half of the summer still to come, I look forward to traveling to the Philippines, learning more around the office, adventuring in the North Carolina mountains, and developing a keen awareness of God’s perfect timing.

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Brielle Lisa '18 is a English writing major with minors in communication and biblical and theological studies. She is currently an intern at Samaritan’s Purse. To learn more, visit their website

Photo captions (from top): Brielle Lisa '18 in front of the Samaritan’s Purse sign; Wheaton interns at Samaritan's Purse, summer 2016: Alexa Dava '17, Brielle Lisa '18, Bella McKay '18, Lydia Kwarteng '17, Jillian Hedges '17, Christy Carlson '17. Row 2: Hannah Sohmer '17, Nicole Kitchen '18, Daniel Travis '17, Joseph Perry '16, Brent Westergren '17, Abby Prince '18; Brielle Lisa '18 and Abby Prince '18 take a hike on Snake Mountain in North Carolina.


Beauty, Brokenness, and Hope in Cape Town

Posted June 29, 2016 by Latreece Mitchel M.A. '17

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Lukahya Education Center

“Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path.” -- Psalm 119:105 

As an intercultural studies student at Wheaton College Graduate School, my Wheaton education has taught me the importance of being prepared, getting myself outside of my comfort zone, and stretching myself. What I love about the intercultural studies program is that it gives me practical tools to use while doing cross-cultural ministry. 

This May, I was able to apply these skills while traveling to Cape Town, South Africa to take part in a short-term internship with a team of Angelos Biblical Institute missionaries from Fresno, California. Excited and eager to begin our journey partnering with local churches and day camps, we were warmly greeted by 20 of our brothers and sisters in Christ upon our arrival. Experiencing such a warm welcome from people who rarely knew us and had only heard about us immediately enhanced my expectations for our trip.

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In Cape Town we taught at several conferences held by local churches. We also led workshops about church ministries, volunteered at educational centers, planned for future conferences, and much more. Every day we would pack up in small cars and head to churches in South African townships where many people publicly admitted their fear of violence and corruption within their communities and ran away from us.

Khayelitsha, Gugulethu, and Samaro are townships where there is much poverty, crime, and brokenness. But when we entered the churches of these townships the people had so much faith and hope--hope in the promises of God. They praised and worship God even in extreme conditions. The pastors in the churches of the townships occupied small spaces and had no instruments or any of the things we sometimes think we “need” for church. Instead, they had Bibles and each other, and did not let their situation stop them from worshiping God.

This showed me the beauty of Cape Town displayed in brokenness. 

The beauty of Cape Town was displayed through the people and their generous hospitality. All of the churches and day-care centers we partnered with gave us a clear and sincere picture of what it means to have a “servant mentality.” 

While I experienced an abundance of cultural differences in Cape Town, one thing that remained the same across all cultures represented was the brokenness we all share as sinners. The Bible says in Romans 3:23, “All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.” During my time in South Africa I saw the brokenness that exists in another country, but I was also able to see the hope that exists through faith in Jesus Christ. Being in Cape Town was not just about nurturing future Christian leaders. Instead, going to South Africa was about experiencing the love of God in a way that we never have before through beauty, brokenness, and hope.

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Latreece Michel M.A. ’17 is a participant in Wheaton’s Intercultural Studies Graduate School program and recipient of the William Hiram Bentley Award for Ministry to the African-American Community. To learn more about Intercultural Studies program, visit their website.

Photo Captions (from top): Pastor Roman gave his all for kids who did not have much by building them a school with his retirement savings called the Lukahya Education Center; Latreece served women who desire to learn, grow, and be encouraged in the word of God at a women's workshop in Khayelitsha; The A.B.I. team's first day of service in Cape Town. Below: Surprise! Latreece's boyfriend proposed at the airport when she returned home. She said yes!

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