My Wheaton

Beyond the Turf

Posted by Kendall Eitreim '15

For Kendall Eitreim ’15, it’s hard to imagine what her undergrad life would have looked like without the Wheaton women varsity soccer team. “Being on the team has 100 percent completely shaped my Wheaton experience,” Eitreim says.

While she has been playing soccer since she was two, she senses a real difference playing on a team made up of Christian peers. 

“God has been so faithful in using people on the team, using the coaches… to be instrumental and encouraging. And it’s fun to do life alongside the girls.”

Eitreim believes that living together and offering friendship and support off the field allows the team to work better together once their cleats hit the turf.

Though she knew from day one that she wanted to be a communication major, Eitreim enjoys taking classes from both inside and outside the department that she believes will prepare her for life beyond Wheaton.

“I just take those classes because I enjoy them and because the professors are wonderful.”

The unifying thread that connects Eitreim’s life as a student and an athlete is the way people at Wheaton—whether in classes or in the locker room—seek to emulate Christ in their daily lives. 

“There are people I’ve been surprised by again and again who have really shown the love of Christ ... There’s something about that that I think is very unique to Wheaton.”

Kendall Eitreim ’16 is a communication major. Learn more about Wheaton soccer on the Wheaton Thunder website, Twitter @Wheaton_Thunder, and Instagram @Wheaton_Thunder.


Our Faces Are Still Illuminated: My HoneyRock Passage Experience

Posted by Brielle Lisa '18

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honeyrock-brielle-lisaThe tiki torches’ flickering light reflected off each face, illuminating them, as we weaved through the woods and up HoneyRock’s ski hill. At the top, I gathered with about 150 of my fellow freshmen around a giant bonfire. Its sparks leaped upward to the vast Wisconsin night sky, beckoning my eyes to follow. The stars were magnificent. We proceeded to lift our voices up to the Creator of those very stars, and then participated in a revitalizing word of prayer. 

This was the beginning of our Passage into the Wheaton community. 

The Camp Track of Wheaton’s Northwoods Passage Program enhanced my transition into college in many ways. I will focus on one: Friendship

After that large group gathering on ski hill, we split into our cabins. Initially, I viewed my cabin as a motley group. We were introverted and extroverted individuals, morning people and not-exactly-morning people, athletic and artsy people from Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong, Illinois, and New Jersey. 

We were “Cabin 12.” 

To my surprise and pleasure, we overcame our differences quite naturally and started building deep relationships with each other. We became very much like a family. We ate meals together, overcame challenge course activities together, camped together, served together, shared our life stories together, and grew in Christ together. 

These friendships did not end at HoneyRock. We still hang out together, eat meals together, and encourage each other together on Wheaton’s campus. I am truly blessed.

In retrospect, I really admire the way Camp Track emphasizes quality of relationships within cabins rather than quantity of relationships within the track. I know Cabin 12 will have each other’s backs during our entire time at Wheaton and beyond. Despite this, many of the people I met during Passage are some of my close friends now. I met Lincoln, who I now serve with on Student Government, during Passage. I met Charissa, a wonderful floormate, during Passage. 

Even though I did not become close friends with everyone I met at Camp Track, it is such a blessing to recognize so many familiar faces and know so many names of my fellow classmates around campus. What really amazes me is that even though there are no tiki torches here on campus, their faces still seem illuminated to me. I believe at least part of that is because of our shared Passage experience, and for that I am eternally grateful.

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Read more about HoneyRock’s Passage program and new, year-long Vanguard program. Photos (above): Brielle Lisa ’18 with members of Cabin 12 at HoneyRock Passage, August 2014.

Experiencing Jerusalem

Posted by Elena Miles '15

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jerusalem-wheaton-holy-landsAt the start of this summer, I had the privilege of traveling with Wheaton in the Holy Lands for three weeks in Israel, a week in Greece, a week in Turkey, and a week in Italy (this year was the program's 42nd annual trip abroad). The classes I took were with professors in Wheaton’s bible and theology department, but I myself am not a theology major—I study history and international relations.

While I loved every minute of visiting churches and historical ruins, our visit to Jerusalem—one of the most relevant cities in the world with regard to International Relations—was my chance to engage with the sites of the modern-day State of Israel. 

As a student of history, I firmly believe that to understand anything about current affairs, one must understand the history behind them—too often, onlookers try and jump in and offer a solution without actually understanding the underlying historical roots behind the conflict. Thanks to classes we took with the Shalom Hartman Institute, we got the chance to engage with the culture, history, and identity of the Jewish Israeli community. Marci Lenk, a scholar at the institute, gave us an introduction to Jewish life from the past couple of centuries. 

These lectures helped pieces of the puzzle begin to come together for me. Suddenly, I understood what a Kibbutz was, why the streets were empty on Saturdays, and the explanation behind the variants of Jewish clothing. By learning about the past, we were able to better understand the present.

Not only did we engage with Judaism on a historical level, but the Institute also allowed us to engage with Judaism on a cultural level. For example, Dr. Lenk graciously hosted us for a Shabbat dinner. By participating with her, we were taking part in a tradition that has been practiced every Friday for thousands of years. 

As Shabbat continued, Dr. Lenk invited us to Synagogue for a Shabbat service. We were able to see for ourselves the differences and similarities in which both Christians and Jews worship. I was able to observe and engage with a Jewish community at large. The entire experience is not really something I can even put into words. 

The only thing I can say is I doubt that I will ever have the chance to witness and engage Jewish culture in that way again. The Shalom Hartman Institute gave me invaluable exposure—an integral part of my understanding of Jewish culture and identity—that will help me better understand the past, present, and future. No amount of books I have read, classes I have taken, or lectures I have heard could have taught me what I learned from the experience of engaging with the Jewish community of Jerusalem. 

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Elena Miles ’15 is a senior studying history and international relations. Photo credits from top: Gini Pera ’16 takes a study break in Jerusalem from the roof of the Jerusalem University College campus; Students celebrate after they conquer a hike to a ridge in the Judean Wilderness between Jerusalem and Jericho. 

My Journey on El Camino de Santiago

Posted by Alley Kammer '16

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Initially, I applied to become a Youth Hostel Ministries team member at Wheaton thinking it would “complete me” by forcing me out of my comfort zone into great conversations all around Europe that would magically strengthen my faith and make me bolder. That wasn’t at all what I experienced during my summer “vacation,” however—I instead found myself working through trying circumstances and practicing spiritual disciplines that broke me to pieces, trusting they would ultimately bear fruit. 

While YHM was one of the most difficult experiences of my life, it was also one of the most beautiful and rewarding of my adventures to date. 

The 200-mile “spiritual pilgrimage” our team took on El Camino de Santiago was a precursor to five weeks of work at The Pilgrim House welcome center in Santiago, Spain (a hostel started by Nate '97 and Faith Wen Walter ’97, two Wheaton College alumni). Throughout our journey on El Camino, we walked as a team, but in many ways had to learn what it meant to be individual pilgrims. 

I learned throughout this time how to take the loneliness I occasionally felt and turn it into a time of solitude in the presence of the Lord. I learned that the pain of walking hundreds of miles with blisters on my feet kept me conscious and aware, and in the moments I had no strength left of my own, it was only God who could get me where I was headed. He provided exactly what I needed to make it through each moment, whether it be a good conversation, kindness, or the majesty in His creation.

Working with Nate and Faith at Pilgrim House in Santiago, I learned there’s beauty in God’s timing that comes from devoting yourself to following Him. Faith told us in their kitchen one evening that if they had known 10 years ago how long it would take to finally open Pilgrim House, they might never have begun. In the same way, had I known how difficult the Camino (let alone the rest of the summer) would be, I might not have had the desire to begin the journey. But God, just as He did with Nate and Faith, provided for me, and was with me every step of the way.

Instead of YHM “completing” me, I came back in pieces. In the same way my Camino shell (a symbol worn around your backpack to signify your participation on the El Camino pilgrimage) came back broken after our two-week hike, so too was I broken and scattered. My YHM journey wasn’t easy, but it inspired me to pursue the passions God has placed on my heart more than ever. On the pilgrim road, I realized my journey is far from over, and I want nothing less than to walk it well. I desire a “Buen Camino,” and I encourage everyone to consider a program like YHM during their time at Wheaton.

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Alley Kammer ’16 is a junior studying interpersonal communication with a Spanish minor. She participated in Wheaton’s Youth Hostel Ministries program this summer. Top: Alley and Nico Lasta ’15 on El Camino de Santiago; Above (l to r): Pilgrim House founder Nate Walter ’97, YHM team members Luke Rynbrandt '16, Brooke Thompson '14, Nico Lasta '15, Alley Kammer ’16, and Pilgrim House co-founder Faith Wen Walter ’97. Read more about the Pilgrim House in Wheaton Magazine.

Project World Impact: A Day in the Life of the 'Social Nonprofit' Network

Posted by Anna Morris '16

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When I accepted a summer internship at Project World Impact (PWI), I was grossly unaware of what working for a start-up company entailed. Although I had networked with alumni for connections, applied for internships online, and loitered around Wheaton's career development center for months, the opportunity to work at PWI actually came from a friend—PWI’s Vice President Grant Hensel, a senior at Wheaton.

Alongside founder Chris Lesner (a Taylor University graduate of 2013), we are building Project World Impact. PWI is a marketing company and social search engine run by 20-somethings. No, you didn’t read that wrong—my bosses are 21.

Our site is like a Facebook made exclusively for nonprofits, except instead of searching for a long-lost-friend’s name, you search for nonprofits by cause and by location. You can see profiles of these organizations complete with photos, videos, and written information about the work they do, as well as donor, staff, and volunteer testimonials. 

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Although our work seldom looks the same day-to-day, we begin each morning with a devotional at our office. After a team meeting and huddle (yes, it is as fun as it sounds to collaborate with people your age), it’s time to work. From calling nonprofits to writing content for the website, working on social media posts to building websites and apps, our team is often engaged in more than one project.

PWI employed 19 Wheaton students this summer, so I get to work alongside many of my peers. They also have several full-time staff members who are Wheaton grads. It’s not a myth that a liberal arts education is a valuable and versatile tool—PWI is a testament to its success in preparing students for meaningful, varied careers.

Because our work is multi-faceted and often changing, I am grateful for the diverse coursework and varied extracurricular activities I’ve pursued at Wheaton. While I have relied heavily on my International Relations work (my international politics and economic growth and development classes have given me a unique lens for my research for the educational portion of our website), I have also used my journalism experience with the Wheaton Record, and my work in calling alumni with Wheaton Phonathon. These activities have given me a valuable skill set to use to build PWI.

Although I didn’t know what working for a start-up company would entail, I have loved my experience at PWI and will cling to the knowledge that, as is true for most things, you will get as much out of an internship as you are willing to put in it. Stay tuned for the rest of Project World Impact’s story to be written—we currently have over 3,000 nonprofits signed up to build profiles, and will be launching our website soon.

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Anna Morris is Project World Impact’s director of content development, and is a junior at Wheaton studying international relations and French. Middle photo: A morning devotional, led by Bill Lesner, in Adams Hall; Above: PWI’s sales team celebrates after hitting their mid-summer sales goal of 2,000 confirmed nonprofits. 

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