Student Activities

Project World Impact: A Day in the Life of the 'Social Nonprofit' Network

Posted by Anna Morris '16

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When I accepted a summer internship at Project World Impact (PWI), I was grossly unaware of what working for a start-up company entailed. Although I had networked with alumni for connections, applied for internships online, and loitered around career services for months, the opportunity to work at PWI actually came from a friend—PWI’s Vice President Grant Hensel, a senior at Wheaton.

Alongside founder Chris Lesner (a Taylor University graduate of 2013), we are building Project World Impact. PWI is a marketing company and social search engine run by 20-somethings. No, you didn’t read that wrong—my bosses are 21.

Our site is like a Facebook made exclusively for nonprofits, except instead of searching for a long-lost-friend’s name, you search for nonprofits by cause and by location. You can see profiles of these organizations complete with photos, videos, and written information about the work they do, as well as donor, staff, and volunteer testimonials. 

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Although our work seldom looks the same day-to-day, we begin each morning with a devotional. After a team meeting and huddle (yes, it is as fun as it sounds to collaborate with people your age), it’s time to work. From calling nonprofits to writing content for the website, working on social media posts to building websites and apps, our team is often engaged in more than one project.

PWI employed 19 Wheaton students this summer, so I get to work alongside many of my peers. They also have several full-time staff members who are Wheaton grads. It’s not a myth that a liberal arts education is a valuable and versatile tool—PWI is a testament to its success in preparing students for meaningful, varied careers.

Because our work is multi-faceted and often changing, I am grateful for the diverse coursework and varied extra-curricular activities I’ve pursued at Wheaton. While I have relied heavily on my International Relations work (my international politics and economic growth and development classes have given me a unique lens for my research for the educational portion of our website), I have also used my journalism experience with the Wheaton Record, and my work in calling alumni with Wheaton Phonathon. These activities have given me a valuable skill set to use to build PWI.

Although I didn’t know what working for a start-up company would entail, I have loved my experience at PWI and will cling to the knowledge that, as is true for most things, you will get as much out of an internship as you are willing to put in it. Stay tuned for the rest of Project World Impact’s story to be written—we currently have over 3,000 nonprofits signed up to build profiles, and will be launching our website soon.

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Anna Morris is Project World Impact’s director of content development, and is a junior at Wheaton studying international relations and French. Middle photo: A morning devotional, led by Bill Lesner, in Adams Hall; Above: PWI’s sales team celebrates after hitting their mid-summer sales goal of 2,000 confirmed nonprofits. 

#WOWeek14: Welcome (Back) to Wheaton!

Posted by Michael Daugherty '15

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orientation-week-2013

Welcome back, Wheaton! 

Student feelings about the new school year are somewhat of a quarry. You’ve got the exhausted-from-summer pebbles, the I-don’t-want-to-start-studying-yet-but-miss-my-friends stones, the eager-to-boast-my-summer-adventure rocks, and the been-waiting-to-get-back-since-May boulders. Or maybe you’re a new student, and, well, you’re not sure what to feel.  

Regardless, it’s a special time for all of us—a chance to be formed together as the worshipping body of Christ and to experience His goodness, provision, and mercies anew!

As part of this year’s Orientation Committee, I’m excited and expectant to see the ways the living Lord will use his already existing “wall” of Wheaton students to participate in His faithfulness to new students. With the combined effort of many, Orientation Week should register as a robust invitation and celebration. It’s a chance to say, "We, the returning students, are eager to accept you into this family, and are excited to serve you. Welcome to a place marked with the love and joy of Christ."

New students, here are some O-Week pointers for ya:

  1. Be ready for the same questions, but ask new and different ones. People want to get to know you, so questions like “Where are you from? What’s your major?” are to be expected. Instead, ask a random question, like “What excites you most about dorm life?”
  2. Embrace the rhythm of O-Week. The days will be full, and you’ll feel your head expanding with new info. Be excited, thankful, and enjoy! 
  3. Take the initiative. The easiest way to meet people is through shared experience. Join a volleyball game, challenge someone to Ping-Pong, walk around downtown Wheaton, or compete in the O-Week Scavenger Hunt. 
  4. Pride yourself on a good “Goodbye.” Don’t shy away from telling your parents you’ll miss them and you love them. You might as well go all out—heck, make it a Hallmark moment. 
  5. Screenshot or Instagram a significant moment. This way, when someone asks about O-Week (which will happen), you have a concrete example to sum up the experience. Don’t forget to use the hashtags #mywheaton and #woweek14.

This year’s theme for Orientation Week is a powerful one: I AM THAT STONE. It comes from 1 Peter 2:4-5, in which Peter constructs a detailed metaphor out of a very common object: a stone. Christians, as “living stones, [being] built into a spiritual house,” are built upon the living Stone—which is Christ, the cornerstone. Thus, our fellowship is in the fellowship of Christ.  

As each of us are called to form “a holy priesthood, offering spiritual sacrifices to God through Jesus Christ,” we should realize that living together is about standing upon the foundation of grace given to us by Christ. As such, a community of grace should always lead us to repentance to God and confession with others. Where grace is lived out, there is abundant life!  

A community of grace a worthwhile challenge. And with Christ at the center, I am eager to see the Lord create a “joyful firmness” among Wheaton students this year!

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Michael Daugherty ’15 is the 2014 Orientation Committee Student Director. A senior from Marion, Indiana, he’s graduating with a degree in Anthropology under the Pre-Medicine tract. He hopes to go into the field of medicine and global health. Top: Students gather at 2013 orientation; Above: Wheaton’s 2014 Orientation Committee. Don't forget to share your orientation memories with the Wheaton family on social media using hashtags #mywheaton and #woweek14!

From Honduras to the Holy Lands

Posted by Beau Westlund '14

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honduras-wheatonWell, that went fast. It’s on all of our minds as we Wheaton College seniors prepare to complete our undergraduate degrees this spring. I can still remember my first day moving into Traber dorm four years ago: I was trying to squeeze all of my belongings onto one half of the room when my roommate suddenly appeared with 11 members of his family, including two toddlers and a crying infant. It’s no wonder this day is emblazoned in my memory.

After a quiet and strictly academic freshman year (some of my floormates referred to me as “the Hermit”), I felt challenged by God to step out of my comfort zone to deliberately become more involved in extracurricular activities. This led to my participation in Honduras Project (HP), an annual student-led mission trip to install a gravity-fed potable water system in a rural village in Honduras.

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After my first trip to Honduras in 2012, I was privileged to serve on cabinet as HP’s communications coordinator in 2013. Both of my years with HP were unforgettable. I learned about leadership and service while making lasting relationships with both my teammates and the villagers I worked alongside while laying piping for the system.

During my sophomore year, I also applied for Wheaton in the Holy Lands (WIHL). This study abroad opportunity with bible and theology faculty members involves traveling during the summer to lands of the Bible. We spent time in Israel, Greece, Turkey, and Italy, journeying to sites where Scripture was brought to life. There are no sensations quite like splashing into the ‘sea’ where Jesus once walked or sweating in the baking sun in Jericho. It made the stories of the Bible come alive in my heart and mind as they took on tangible, beautiful new meaning. On the final morning in Jerusalem, I watched the sun rise from the Mount of Olives and wondered if Jesus had ever taken the time to soak up this view.

Now, during my last semester on campus, I’m working as an editorial intern at Wheaton magazine. In addition to carrying out traditional copyediting tasks and attending editorial planning meetings, I’ve also been able to publish the magazine’s print material online. My professional skill set has grown—I can now operate within a content management system (I didn’t even know what that was before I started here), maneuver through software like Photoshop, and conduct official interviews.

I’m an introvert—but that doesn’t mean I can let opportunities pass me by due to my uncertainty. Stepping out from my studies to engage other facets of experiential learning has transformed my life, and I’m so thankful for God making each risk worthwhile. As I look to the future that lay before me, I trust that God will continue to provide for this Hermit, wherever He leads me.

Beau Westlund ’14 is Wheaton magazine’s editorial intern. A senior from Bettendorf, Iowa, Beau is graduating with a degree in English with a concentration in writing, and hopes to work in the HR/PR/media field.

My Wheatonisms

Posted by Morgan Jacob '17

Wheaton studentWhen I came to Wheaton, I expected it to be another four years of my high school experience. Now don’t get me wrong, I really enjoyed high school, but I wanted college to be a new chapter of my life, not the rereading of an old one. During my senior year, I tried to stay away from any Christian college. I was headed straight for the most academically rigorous school out there, and I didn’t think a Christian school could give me the level of education I wanted.

At least, not until I came to Wheaton. When I visited, I became completely convinced that I could get a great Christian education. However, it wasn’t until I actually began to live here that I realized the value of the Wheaton community. In students, professors, everyone, the love of Christ shines brightly. If someone had told me that I would find a second family—most of which were within five years of my age—during the first year I came to Wheaton, I would have thought they were joking, but God provided.

As I began to grow in this community, I increasingly found quirky and idiosyncratic things about this place. I started to post and number the funniest, weirdest, and most impactful ones on Facebook as my very own Wheatonisms.  Here are a few examples:

Wheatonism #4: “integration of faith and learning”

If you ever come to Wheaton, you’ll hear this over and over again, and thankfully, the professors mean it. I haven’t had a class yet in which the professor hasn’t connected the discipline with the Bible.

Wheatonism #10: People dress as Bible characters for Halloween

Abraham. Isaac. Jacob. Not to mention Jesus…

Wheatonism #11: Chicken Finger Day in SAGA (Anderson Commons)

Chicken fingers come around once or twice a semester in the dining room, and trust me, you won’t understand until it happens. At home, I don’t even like chicken fingers. But here, it’s not just food; it’s part of the culture.

Wheatonism #19: Floating

Okay, so first, you craft a root beer float using two straws, then you find a couple that looks like they might be on a first date. (Bonus points if at least one of them is a close friend!) You walk up to the table sneakily, and put the float between them. Let the awkwardness begin!

Wheatonism #24: Professors Care

One of your profs begins to tear up as he says, "If anything I have taught you has been of Christ, hold on to it. If anything I have taught has not been of Christ, I pray that God would cast it away from you. At the end of the day, I hope you saw Christ, not me, in this class." Needless to say, there was a rush of applause at the end of that day, for we did see Christ in that room, every day we were in it. However, it was not merely the level of respect for God's word and honest search for its understanding which won our hearts and ears, but also the care for the lives of each and every one of his 100+ students, shown partly by the fact that he knew ALL of our names.

So all in all, my freshman year a Wheaton has been great so far! I can’t wait to see what the rest of the year brings. But a piece of advice to all of you prospective students out there: If you want to find a place where people search for God wholeheartedly, love each other in community, and seek for knowledge deeply, come to Wheaton. That’s who we are.

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