Student Activities

My Internship at Samaritan’s Purse

Posted July 6, 2016 by Brielle Lisa '18

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Sign

“Mom! We have to go to the store right away! I want to get her a notebook and colored pencils!” 

Year after year I remember incessantly pestering my mother so I could go pick out toys for our Operation Christmas Child shoeboxes. That was my first exposure to Samaritan’s Purse.

My next exposure to Samaritan’s Purse was during fall of my freshman year at Wheaton, when representatives came to Wheaton’s campus to recruit for their internship program. That day, I made a mental note to apply for an internship during the following year. This past fall, I had my heart set on becoming a #SPintern

I was drawn to this internship for multiple reasons, first and foremost because Samaritan’s Purse not only meets people's physical, earthly needs, but also their spiritual, eternal needs. Samaritan’s Purse serves for Christ and His Kingdom.

SamaritansPurse

Throughout my application process, Wheaton’s Center of Vocation and Career reviewed my resume and cover letter, provided me with access to Big Interview (interactive online interview tutorials), and encouraged me each step of the way. 

Now I am almost halfway through my internship as an editorial intern in the Communications Department at Samaritan’s Purse’s International Headquarters in Boone, NC. I spend time writing, editing, researching, and marketing. One of the most exciting projects I am a part of is an Operation Christmas Child marketing campaign targeting 15-23 year olds. As part of the target demographic, I have been able to contribute a valuable perspective. I am also traveling to the Philippines as the lead writer for an Operation Christmas Child shoebox distribution in July—it is amazing how God orchestrates full circle stories.

I enjoy beginning every work day with staff devotions, a time when all 600 employees meet together; “grabbing meals” with my coworkers; hiking after work with fellow interns; and seeing familiar Wheaton faces as there are 11 other Wheaton students interning here, too! 

My goal for my internship is to learn as much as possible—about writing, editing, relief work, professionalism, people’s stories, and Christ’s call on my life. With that, I am thankful for all I have learned at Wheaton. My Christian liberal arts education teaches me to synthesize and think theologically. My professors teach me to show and not tell stories, to read critically, and to communicate clearly. The Wheaton student body, faculty, and staff teach me how to live in community. I get to use all these skills during my internship.

With the next half of the summer still to come, I look forward to traveling to the Philippines, learning more around the office, adventuring in the North Carolina mountains, and developing a keen awareness of God’s perfect timing.

NC

Brielle Lisa '18 is a English writing major with minors in communication and biblical and theological studies. She is currently an intern at Samaritan’s Purse. To learn more, visit their website

Photo captions (from top): Brielle Lisa '18 in front of the Samaritan’s Purse sign; Wheaton interns at Samaritan's Purse, summer 2016: Alexa Dava '17, Brielle Lisa '18, Bella McKay '18, Lydia Kwarteng '17, Jillian Hedges '17, Christy Carlson '17. Row 2: Hannah Sohmer '17, Nicole Kitchen '18, Daniel Travis '17, Joseph Perry '16, Brent Westergren '17, Abby Prince '18; Brielle Lisa '18 and Abby Prince '18 take a hike on Snake Mountain in North Carolina.


My Internship With Chick-Fil-A

Posted June 16, 2016 by Laura Jauch '16

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Chick-Fil-A

This summer is shaping up to be better than I ever could have expected. It all started last December, when I began preparing for internship interviews with Wheaton’s Center for Vocation and Career (CVC). They helped me put together my resume and rehearse the interview questions that landed me an internship with one of the most loved quick-service restaurants in the country: Chick-Fil-A. Internships are becoming more and more important for today’s college students and I couldn’t be more honored and excited to be part of such a fantastic and well-known organization. 

I have the privilege of working with Chick-Fil-A’s Information Technology department, helping them develop innovative enterprise solutions using Amazon Web Services. As a member of Chick-Fil-A’s well-developed internship program, I am gaining experience in technology initiatives, leadership, as well as in personal and team development. In fact, this year’s interns have already gone on a team-building retreat with WinShape Teams (a member of Chick-Fil-A’s nonprofit arm). 

Chick-Fil-A-picture

The experiences that accompany the internship speak volumes about the heart and humility of the company. We recently had the opportunity to eat dinner at Chick-Fil-A CEO Dan T. Cathy’s house, which included crazy activities like operating a full-sized excavator, if one so chose (pictured above). Our summer calendar is full of “Lunch and Learns”: informal gatherings where we get to hear from and get to know senior executives and key company leaders. Chick-Fil-A’s corporate campus in Atlanta includes access to an on-site fitness facility, outdoor running trails and, yes, free lunch every weekday. Seriously, this job is amazing. 

It is fulfilling to see the results of my Wheaton education being used to solve real, on-the-ground problems that have the potential to contribute to the company’s success. My classes at Wheaton provided me with the technical understanding and problem-solving skills I need to be successful in a corporate environment. Additionally, my professors and classmates have taught me how to communicate clearly and ask good questions so that I can work best alongside my supervisor and take full advantage of the rich opportunities Chick-Fil-A has to offer. I’m excited to grow not only technologically, but also as a leader and team player. 

Chick-Fil-A-Jauch

Laura Jauch ’16 is a computer science major interning in Chick-Fil-A’s Information Technology department this summer. Learn more about Wheaton’s Center for Vocation and Career on their website. 

Photo captions (from top): A welcome board on display at the Chick-Fil-A interns' WinShape Teams retreat; the excavator at Chick-Fil-A CEO Dan T. Cathy’s property; Laura at her internship desk.

Lights, Camera, Action: Arts in London

Posted May 31, 2016 by Alyssa Stadtlander '18, Jeff Melanson '17

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Walking through Leicester Square in London’s West End, marquee lights shine and beckon audiences through their doors for evenings of art, theater, and music featuring The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, Wicked, The Phantom of the Opera, Guys and Dolls...and the list goes on. We walk past the marquees and enter inside, anticipating together an evening of new experiences and excitement. 

The best part of Wheaton’s Arts in London summer program is the chance to experience and study art, music, and theater in a city where these are embedded in their thriving culture. The program offers students credit for three classes: Art Survey, Intro to Music/World Music, and Music Theater in London. During the last two weeks of our time in London, we have been studying art in galleries, looking at paintings in museums while we learn about them, learning about music from numerous different cultures and ethnicities (particularly Celtic culture in the Welsh countryside), and discovering the history of music theater as it relates to London.

We decided to do the Arts in London program because London’s art scene encourages, facilitates, and enhances our ability to learn. This knowledge outweighs learning that can be done on campus at Wheaton, especially since the students on this program are from a variety of majors (a little over half of the members of our group this year are arts students at Wheaton). 

Wheaton’s art program on campus prepared us for this journey, and made London’s art scene accessible to us. For example, one of our professors, Mark Lewis, associate professor of communication and director of Arena Theater at Wheaton, always encourages us to linger and take an extra breath when most people would pass by or rush through moments. We are reminded to look with intention, and only then will we begin to truly “see.” This mentality has been a beautiful way to participate in the art that is happening everywhere, in and out of the galleries and theaters in London. This practice has also inspired me to see what art truly is and how to engage with it in everyday life--a crucial part of my London experience thus far. 

We are only halfway through our Arts in London adventure, but have already seen the iconic Globe Theater, the National Gallery, West End musicals, operas, and concerts, all the while being fully immersed in the bustling London metropolis. We also recently traveled internationally to Knighton, Wales, for a chance to breathe, relax, and experience Celtic art before returning back to the heart of London for another week and a half of exploration and study.

Alyssa Stadtlander ’18 and Jeff Melanson ’17 are participants in Wheaton’s Arts in London program. To learn more, visit Arts in London’s website

Photo Captions (from top): Contemplating a Monet in the Tate Modern (l to r): Jill Kuhlman '19, Enoch Leung '18, Max Pointer '18; Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament; Day trip to Brighton (l to r): Paul Hunter '17, Alyssa Stadtlander '18, Jon Bartolomucci '18, Max Pointner '18, David O'Reagan '17.

#MyWheaton: HoneyRock's Summer Leadership School

Posted May 25, 2016 by Christiana McGann '18, Malena Sweers '17

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This summer, junior Christiana McGann ’18 (below, at left) and senior Malena Sweers ’17 (below, right) are at HoneyRock, the Outdoor Center for Leadership Development of Wheaton College, participating in Summer Leadership School (SLS). Below, they share a bit about why they chose to spend their summers in classes, training, and as paid cabin counselors in a dynamic summer camp program for young people. 

Q: Why did you sign up to do HoneyRock’s Summer Leadership School (SLS)? 

Malena: I signed up for SLS because I wanted to be a part of the worshipful community at HoneyRock, members constantly inviting each other to love God as we participate in His creation together. When I transferred to Wheaton the spring of my sophomore year, the group of students who welcomed and loved me most had all been involved at HoneyRock, most of them with the SLS program. Their stories and high praise of the summer at HoneyRock moved me to keep the program in mind. At the start of this past fall semester other components moved around too, and I became the first SLS recruit of the year! 

Q: What is SLS all about? 

Christiana: In addition to being a leadership program, SLS is a unique ministry experience that demands learning and adapting as you go. That being said, the preparations we have received, in the form of various meetings, CPR training sessions, and my personal favorite—the winter retreat at HoneyRock we took this February—have only heightened my excitement. I had my first glimpse of HoneyRock during our retreat. Throughout that freezing weekend, I tasted for myself the sweetness of “a place apart.” The weekend involved zany team-building activities and times of solitude. We reveled in the exhilaration of snow-tubing and in various star-gazing treks on the frozen lake. And of course, I will never forget the infamous polar plunge. There is nothing quite as bonding as a dip in freezing waters during the balmy month of January. As we huddled for warmth beside a crackling bonfire, I recall feeling a strange sense of kinship with my fellow “crazies.” The weekend left me eagerly anticipating the summer to come. 

Malena: SLS is a program that equips college students like myself to guide campers entering 4 th through 9 th grade through a couple weeks of outdoor adventures, and to teach us how to be present with them to help process camp experiences. “SLS’ers” prepare with classes and training for five weeks before campers arrive. I am grateful for this time counselors have to become familiar with each other, learning how to build one another up when either joy or exhaustion prevails. 


Q: What are you most looking forward to about this summer? 

Christiana: The greatly anticipated SLS will be a summer full of thrilling stories and adventures to tell. I cannot wait to savor nature in a place of quiet, to hike and stargaze to my heart’s content. There’s something unique about the breathtaking view of a hike or the immensity of an array of stars. These are times in nature where I palpably feel God’s presence. I also look forward to reflective and quiet times to sit with and ponder hard questions. I want to meet God in a fresh way that renews my delight in the Lord. Finally, I cannot wait for the relationships I will find at HoneyRock. The people with whom I will interact, both campers and those I work alongside, will be sure to challenge me in ways that I can’t envision. In short, I’m at the brink of a summer of memories and crazy experiences that will create friendships like nothing else. In the words of Ellie from Up, “Adventure is out there!” 

Photos (from top): Christiana (at left) and Malena on Chrouser Lawn at HoneyRock in May 2016. Photos credit Alexander Lee ’18.

Learn more and apply to HoneyRock’s summer programs and camps on their website.

#MyWheaton: Amazing Grace

Posted May 19, 2016 by Robin Kong '16

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“Ordinary” is not necessarily the best word to describe the past couple of years at Wheaton College. The College suffered from multiple incidents and divisive responses about such incidents from society. Seeing the media quite frequently bashing on my College that I love was definitely one of my lowest points of this year.

While mourning and being heartbroken for the College and its separations, I wondered if there was any fundamental belief that could draw an absolute and complete agreement from anyone on campus.

Romans 8:28 says: “And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose.” To give hope to those who, like me, mourn for the separation of campus, I decided to produce a musical project based on the message of the unity of Christ. The mission statement of project was simple: get students from very different places of Wheaton – the Conservatory and the football team, for instance – to sing about the same thing – the grace of Christ.

With the short amount of time I had left in the school year, I had to move quickly. First, I contacted my friend Adam Lindgren ’16 and asked for an all-voice arrangement of “Amazing Grace.” I could not find a better song or better arranger to represent the message of unity through voices. Next, I reached out to multiple people and asked for their musical participation on this project. I contacted the presidents of different organizations on campus and asked for a participant from each group as a representative. Each artist, by participating on this project, supports the purpose of this project by representing his or her group. Last, to be able to advertise the final product to the student body, parents, faculty and staff members, I came up with the name of this project – Project UNITY. 

During the journey, I was blown away by the number of participants and the amount of willingness of each and every musician who was on board. I was able to record 30 artists, and though my time at studio was sometimes quite exhausting, their enthusiasm and passion constantly reminded me of why I started this project in the first place. With a total of 80 hours in Shea studio with lots of encouragements and help from different friends, I reached the end of the journey last week and launched the final product of Project UNITY ("Amazing Grace," above). 

I thank my advisors, helpers, and musicians who were with me this entire journey – this mix is meaningful not because of its quality, but because of its message behind it, and this message could not have been delivered if it weren’t for them. I thank Wheaton College for providing me such an awesome opportunity to witness Christ during this entire process. Finally, I thank God for bringing us unity, and giving us an ability to praise and sing for His glory. 

RobinKong-Wheaton-College

Each singer who participated on this project represents the organization or club that he/she is involved in: Student Government, College Union, Gospel Choir, Swing Club, Resident Life, Track Team, Diakonoi, Discipleship Small Group, Men's Glee Club, Football, Concert Choir, Arena Theater, Amplify, Summer Ministry Program, Phonathon, Women's Chorale, Mu Kappa, Thundertones, Koinonia, the Wheaton Record, and many more. Adam Lindgren '16, Lucian Taylor '17, and Brian Porick '98 recorded, mixed, and mastered the project, and artists who participated on this project include Aly Vukelich '17, Matt Zuckermann '17, Andrea Artis '16, Emily Lengel '16, Josh Knowlton '17, Sola Olateju '17, Jenny Ruda '18, Peter Fenton '17, Peter Desrosier '16, Joshua Buzz Aldrin '16, Lydia Saldanha '17, Brittany Blue '16, Emma Camillone '18, Catherine Hall '18, Luke Goodman '18, Katherine Harrison '18, Kiersten Williams '18, Emma Baker '17, Elizabeth Bretscher '19, Eugenia Kang '16, Sarah Han '16, David Batdorf '16, Elliot Franklin '17, Austin Odling '18, Lucas Anholzer '18, Calvin Brown '16, Jeff Burge '17, Charles Nystrom '18, and Kirkland An '17. 

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