The Arts

Spreading a Message of Love

Posted March 31, 2017 by Steve Gaskin M.A. '18

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#myWheaton Graduate School | Steve Gaskin '17 from Wheaton College on Vimeo.

Steve Gaskin M.A. ’18 is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Biblical Studies and serves as a Graduate Resident Adviser and Adviser for the Orientation Committee at Wheaton College. As an undergrad, Steve majored in Sociology/African American Diaspora and minored in Theater & Drama at Indiana University. 

Before coming to Wheaton, Steve served as a traveling hip-hop artist with The Impact Movement, through which he was able to witness the Gospel being spread across the globe. He also helped plant a church in Chicago from 2014-16. 

Graduate Orientation marked Steve’s first day on Wheaton’s campus, and what very well could have been his last. He was discouraged by the lack of African-American male representation in Barrows Auditorium. “I felt like I couldn’t relate to anybody… I felt alone, I felt sad; I felt like this just wasn’t the place for me.” 

But his mood changed when one professor excitedly called out to him in the hallway, saying he was “so glad” Steve was finally there. At that moment, Steve knew God had a purpose for him at Wheaton and since that day, he has had a “peace” as he is constantly reminded that he is exactly where God wants him to be. 

Steve considers himself passionate, fun-loving, and a “reckless dreamer” and hopes to use the foundations of his faith and his artistic talent to reach people with a message of love, hope, and redemption. 

Watch the video above to learn more about Steve’s #MyWheaton experience.

To learn more about Wheaton, connect with Wheaton College Undergraduate Admissions. Set up a visit, or apply now.

The Best of Both Worlds: My Experience as a Conservatory of Music Student-Athlete

Posted March 24, 2017 by Alice Zhang '18

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My experience as a Conservatory of Music student-athlete has been a challenging and rewarding one. As a member of the swim team and as a double major participating in two Conservatory ensembles, I am fortunate to be a part of so many dynamic communities. 

Being a member of the Wheaton College swim team is one of the best decisions I have made. In my experience, the swim team is the most tight-knit and crazy community on campus, sewn together by numerous team activities, idiosyncratic inside jokes and pranks, and our fearless coaches. A highlight of mine as a Wheaton swimmer is competing in the CCIW Conference Championship in February. After months of relentless training, the team unites one last time and delights in each other’s athletic successes in a whirlwind of emotions. This experience is by far the best example of how the body of Christ is greater than the sum of the individuals. 

Managing these commitments requires a great deal of flexibility from my ensemble directors and coaches, and I have had to establish a balance between rehearsals, swim meets, and concerts early on. My teammates and fellow musicians have been very supportive of my endeavors, often filling me in after missed team meetings and rehearsals. I find that enlarging my perspective during the busy days is especially advantageous because it gives me a moment to see how God has blessed me with versatility and an ability to adapt in such distinct communities. 

For those interested in the athletics or Conservatory of Music programs at Wheaton College, I would encourage you to try one of these groups because I believe that participation in these groups is essential for a liberal arts education. I have discovered that the skills I have fostered in the pool, like discipline and mental toughness, are also integral parts of being a thriving student and musician, and vice versa. You will find that joining an extracurricular group—or multiple groups—will greatly enhance your Wheaton experience.

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Alice Zhang '18 is a Music and Economics double major and is also taking elective studies in business. She is an active member of both the Symphonic Band and Symphony Orchestra at Wheaton, and the 2016-2017 academic year marked her third as a member of the Varsity Women's Swimming Team. Photo captions (top to bottom): a Symphony Orchestra performance; Alice and fellow swim team members.

To learn more about Wheaton, connect with Wheaton College Undergraduate Admissions. Set up a visit, or apply now

Spring Break at HoneyRock: African Music Immersion Week

Posted March 16, 2017 by Kathryn Jancaus '18

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aiw-honeyrockMy spring break at HoneyRock for African Music Immersion Week was a time of both refreshment and challenge. Physical and relational refreshment came from camp activities like tubing, canoeing, ice skating and taking walks with new friends. It was also refreshing to learn through doing as we constructed Xhosa musical bows and sang South African church songs in workshops led by ethnomusicologist Dr. Dave Dargie. We learned that body movement is viewed as a way of expressing sincerity in African music, and we practiced worshiping with our bodies in dance as we sang church songs. All together, a highlight of the week for me was physical refreshment and reconnecting with my body’s God-given capabilities for play, creativity, and worship. 

I decided to participate in African Music Immersion Week because I’m interested in world music, but I wasn’t sure what to expect. Looking back, I was surprised by both the joys and challenges of the experience. Our workshops challenged me to venture outside my comfort zone and to abandon self-consciousness about dancing, leading songs, and practicing clicks in the Xhosa language. Entering into study of South African history was also very challenging: as we watched films and heard stories from our professors about the oppression of Black South Africans during apartheid, my classmates and I felt the heavy weight of injustice. Dr. Johann Buis, the leader of our trip, opened discussion on the question: Why study past injustice when it is so depressing? Along with this, we discussed a more general question: Why study the history and culture of others? 

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Our response to the first question was: we study human wrongdoing on the societal level not only to lament for past events, but so that we become more sensitive and so we will care about promoting justice. Learning about South Africa’s past helps us to care about justice in this country and the world. And, to the second question we said: cross-cultural learning can be a way of showing Christ-like love. In his love for us, Jesus took on our humanity with all its struggles, joys, and suffering. We can imitate Christ’s incarnational love by showing that we value what is deeply important to other people, like the way Dr. Dargie has shown respect for the Xhosa people by learning and preserving their traditions. 

For me, African Music Immersion Week helped to affirm the value of studying arts, culture, and history as Christians. As I remember this week of learning, I hope that it will continue to help me explore how my studies at Wheaton can reflect God’s love for the world. 

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Kathryn Jancaus ’18 is majoring in Music History and Literature and minoring in Mandarin Chinese. Photo captions (top to bottom): The view from Kathryn's canoe during African Music Immersion Week at HoneyRock; Dr. Dave Dargie and Dr. Johann Buis talk with drummers Henry Williams, Joel Campau, and Hope Ross between songs; Kathryn enjoying the sunny weather with her custom-made bow during spring break at HoneyRock. Photos credit Savannah Norton ’19. 

To learn more about Wheaton, connect with Wheaton College Undergraduate Admissions. Set up a visit, or apply now. To learn more about HoneyRock and their gap year program, Vanguard, visit their website

The Study of Creation

Posted February 16, 2017 by Natalie Flemming '18

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Natalie Flemming ’18 is the embodiment of the liberal arts. A biology and art major, she thrives in both the lab and the studio as she seeks a thorough understanding of creation.

Natalie hopes to become a medical or scientific illustrator — to produce accurate and visually appealing sketches for textbooks and other publications. 

"I think that inevitably studying both biology and art leads to a study of creation," she says. "And as we are able to study creation we can understand a little bit more about who God is by understanding the world he has made around us."

Natalie is also a member of the women’s club ultimate frisbee team and serves as a youth group leader at Wheaton Bible Church. Some of her works can be seen across campus, including a creative nail-and-string depiction of a monk displayed in the Smith-Traber residence hall.

Watch the video above to learn more about how Wheaton has allowed Natalie to combine her passions of science and art. 

Natalie Flemming ’18 is a junior studying biology and art. Learn more about Wheaton’s academic programs here. Video filmed, produced, and edited by Andrew Suk.

Confronting Identity Through Traditional Dance

Posted November 18, 2016 by Serena Suh '18

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serena-suhIt is the night of the talent show. Over the past three months, I had probably practiced every second of my dance more times than the hours I’d slept this semester. The emcees call my name. I walk out and take my place on stage. With the audience, I watch a short clip of a young girl and her father in traditional Korean dress prancing merrily down a dirt path. It is a scene from Spirit’s Homecoming (귀향), a film dedicated to comfort women during the Japanese occupation in Korea. Although I am two generations removed from the colonial experience, the memory of terror and injustice still remains in painfully striking ways. I am a 1.5 generation Korean American (meaning I was born in Korea but moved to the states at a very young age), and therefore face the dilemma of belonging to Korea or the United States, yet I still feel a strange sense of familiarity to this history. 

This—Korea’s story of pain and resilience, my story as a Korean American—is the story that I wanted to convey at the talent show. 

However, it was not always so rosy for the few months preceding the show. There were multiple times when I doubted my performance. You see, Asian Americans have a history of being seen as an “other” in the United States. It has been manifested in so many ways throughout history. Especially as a person who has called the States my home, this is hurtful. The question arose: am I just perpetuating the othering experienced by so many Asian immigrants? Will my dance be received well by the audience? While talent show was a very fun experience, it also forced me to confront the questions of identity that I never really had before. In the end, I was able to perform that night with a calm heart. However, it was only through the conversations with different students, staff, and faculty that I confidently walked onto stage. Fellow students encouraged me to be confident and cheered me on as I spent hours in the dance studio; faculty and staff were affirming and comforting, reminding me that what I believe and who I am should be embraced. 

Although sometimes stressful, this experience has reminded me why I am still excited to be at Wheaton College. There are so many people here that encourage, stretch, and grow me in ways that I cannot imagine happening anywhere else. And so, inspired not only by the video of the Korean father and daughter, but also by the amazing support of my friends at Wheaton, I danced. 

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Serena Suh ’18 is a philosophy (integrated anthropology) and international relations double major at Wheaton. Photo captions (top to bottom): Serena performing a traditional fan dance at the 2016 Wheaton Talent Show; Serena and fellow Mac 4 floormates at the 2016 President's Ball.

To learn more about Wheaton, connect with Wheaton College Undergraduate Admissions. Set up a visit, or apply now.

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