2015 Student Video Competition Winners

Posted by Zack Johnston 17, Larryon Truman 16, Matthew Adams '17


For this year's 2015 video contest, we asked students to capture their Wheaton experience on video in less than three minutes. The videos were judged on originality, creativity, production quality, and reflection of Wheaton's Mission and Community Covenant. Here are the three winning selections:

Zack Johnston '17

"Our Wheaton"

"I really wanted to get at the heart of why I, and a number of people I know, are at Wheaton. There is a lot of talk about how it's a great education and you have tons of opportunities afterwards and we always have some really impressive Wheaton alum come speak for graduation or chapel or lectures or what have you... But their success isn't really my interest. I love that all that and more is true about Wheaton, but in actuality, I'm much more interested in the person sitting next to me than the person on stage or their accolades.

My original inspiration was the song "Beautiful Things" by Gungor. The idea is that God makes beautiful things out of each of us, and I genuinely consider it a privilege to be a part of or even merely a witness to the part of that process here at Wheaton." -- Zack Johnston '17

Larryon Truman '16

"Worship is a Lifestyle"

"My roommate, Conner Vick, and I wanted to portray worship as a lifestyle and more than just singing songs. Worship encompasses every aspect of our being, and we are able to glorify God by honoring him through the gifts He has given us. Through this video, we wanted to encourage the student body to be mindful that we can worship God in our day-to-day activities." -- Larryon Truman '16

Matthew Adams '17

"Feet of Wheaton"

"As a dancer, my feet help me communicate my passion and love for music! Through this video I am able to show the diversity of things feet do here at Wheaton. On top of that, these feet are effecting change for Christ and His kingdom which is truly beautiful!” -- Matthew Adams '17

Learn more about the winners on their author bio pages and check out last years winners here. Stay tuned for our student photo contest in Spring 2016. 

My Pre-Med Liberal Arts Experience

Posted by Daniel Tannous '16


Growing up, I always heard positive things about Wheaton College from high school teachers and physicians who had attended. Despite my tour of campus on a cold, gray day, I was drawn to the College’s traditional brick buildings and strong academic programs. Walking through Edman Chapel, I knew this was a school where I would grow closer to Christ through relationships with my peers.















I have been particularly thankful for the way Wheaton’s liberal arts program has enhanced my pre-med studies, shaping me into a better scholar in my pursuit of medical school. Taking Philosophy 101 helped me to better formulate my views on health care issues and changed the way I view what it means to be human. As I am particularly interested in pediatrics, my Developmental Psychology course provided me with a foundational understanding of children’s growth and development.

This past summer, I had the opportunity to intern abroad in Kunming, China, through the Applied Health Sciences (AHS) department. I was grateful for the opportunity to apply what I’ve learned in some of my AHS classes to the work I was doing. For students interested in pursuing medical school, PA school, nursing school, and any other pre-health field, Wheaton is an excellent choice. With pre-health students from all different backgrounds, opportunities for research, and challenging classes, I have continued to give thanks for the ways I have been shaped by peers and professors.

Although I expected to grow spiritually throughout my time at Wheaton, I never anticipated the spiritual challenges Christ would use to call me to Himself.  As I have struggled with spiritual complacency and identity formation, my friends on campus have continued to encourage and support me. One of the biggest challenges I have faced at Wheaton has been prioritizing both my relationship with God and friends amid a busy schedule. I am continually thankful for the way my friends, chapel messages, and the College reminds me to keep Christ at the center of my life.

Daniel Tannous '16 is a senior Applied Health Science major. Originally from Phoenix, AZ, he grew up in Kunming, China. To learn more about Wheaton's Applied Health Science Program (AHS), visit their website. 

Photo Caption: Daniel with friends at Honey Rock over fall break. 

Arena Theatre's Caucasian Chalk Circle

Posted by Max Pointner '18



“The war is over! Beware the Peace!” declares a character in Brecht’s “The Caucasian Chalk Circle.” Arena Theater’s production of Brecht’s play emphasizes the playwright’s quest for peace and justice in the face of war.

Brecht is known for his usually heavy plays, and he was a pioneer of modern theater, advocating for art which encouraged social change and action. He does not try to entertain, but to provoke thought. He weaves humor over his weighty topics, yet is not afraid to momentarily show the audience the darkness he dances around.

“The Caucasian Chalk Circle,” perfectly captures the ambiguity of a war zone: the audience is faced with both the menace and grandeur of battle, the invasion and desperate plight of the insignificant. Even the resolution of the play is overshadowed by unanswered questions: does war further justice? Does justice further peace?  As an actor, these ambiguities are a space for work.

“The Caucasian Chalk Circle” calls for over 70 characters and Arena Theater’s current production is populated by only 18 actors. We are all playing many roles, attacking problems from several points of view. Many of these characters are terrible people: selfish, deceitful, filthy. It is the actor’s job to humanize them, and I find myself asking, “How is this person better than I?”


I am forced to be patient, generous, and even merciful with these characters as I simultaneously use them to tell a story while also authentically advocating for them in their own risky worlds. Perhaps it is this mercy which can further peace in the world as we reach out to “the least of these.” 

Brecht keeps his story moving through song and Arena’s production pairs the confrontational, driving energy of hip-hop music with the playwright’s need to be heard. Beats and textures dominate the soundscape as characters and musicians fall in and out of rhythm with Brecht’s songs and dialogue. 

Working with composer Elliot Leung '17 and director Michael Stauffer, we fit words to music to stage in a daunting feat of multi-media manipulation. We decided to end the play with a prayer. 

I adapted the tune of this “Dona Nobis Pacem” from the end of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 8, composed shortly after WWII. The tempestuous symphony plots the end of a turbulent war and concludes in a major key, but deep rumblings of twisted musical phrases continue beneath the tranquility. The peace is not so peaceful after all. To reference Isaiah, though: we cry for peace! There is none. Perhaps as Christians we are the peacemakers of the world. Brecht certainly begs us to be.


Max Pointner '18 is a sophomore art history major and part of Arena Theatre. To learn more about Wheaton theatre and the play Caucasian Chalk Circle, visit Arena Theatre's website.

Photo Captions: Lauren Gathman '17 and Olivia Wilder '16; Max Pointner '18 and Wilder; Gathman, Travis Shanahan '16, John Ingraham '18

Photo Credits: Paul Vermeesch '18 

College Union: Live, Laugh, Let Loose!

Posted by Tyler Hansen '16


During our last All School Communion, Chaplain Blackmon asked the student body to take out our phones and tweet our prayer for Wheaton College. Without hesitation, I typed with my millennial-paced thumbs, “that our campus would take itself less seriously.” This prayer for Wheaton has also motivated my involvement in College Union during my junior and senior years at Wheaton.

College Union is an organization composed of 12 students who coordinate some of Wheaton’s most beloved events: President’s Ball, Talent Show, Roller Disco, Air Jam, Class Films, and dozens more. But College Union is about so much more than simply drawing large crowds of people. We believe that behind the strange costumes, loud music, and goofy events lie our mission and purpose—because Wheaton students, myself included, have a tendency to take ourselves too seriously.

On College Union, we believe that our events matter to the vitality of our campus because they remind our accomplishment and excellence-saturated culture that there is more to us as people than what we do, or what we accomplish. A good GPA, which I may or may not possess, or a robust résumé, of which I may or may not boast, are fine, but they can never take the place of laughter, goofiness, or letting loose that is necessary for human flourishing. As the song goes, “a little party never killed nobody.”

This mission, to offer events that energize our student body, keeps the College Union team motivated to continue to provide some of the staple events that our campus community looks forward to every year. But this doesn’t exhaust College Union’s mission: this year’s team is always looking for new and fresh ways to invigorate our campus. Already this year we have introduced a mechanical bull at our annual square dance and used the French House as a massive canvas for community art pieces. Who knows what this year’s College Union team will dream up next? And hopefully, event by event, our campus will be encouraged to play, goof around, and ultimately, take ourselves less seriously.


Tyler Hansen '16, a Biblical and Theological studies major, is the president of CU this year. Visit their websites for more information about College Union and Student Activities Office (SAO) events. 

Photo Credits: College Union 2014-15; Taylor Schuster '16 tries his hand at the square dance's mechanical bull this fall; students explore the spray-painted walls of the French House during College Union's SASS event. 

From China to Wheaton: TESOL and Intercultural Studies

Posted by Natasha Zeng M.A. '16


It was October 1, 2014. After a seemingly endless copy editing session with the staff of Huntington University’s campus newspaper, I clicked into my email box to filter through my messages. It was there that I found my acceptance letter from the Wheaton College Graduate School.

“Dear Natasha, I am pleased inform you that you are being offered admission to the Masters of Arts program in Intercultural Studies and TESOL …”

I rubbed my eyes. 

I couldn’t believe what I saw. 

Wheaton is my dream school. Back in 2007, I went to Franklin Graham’s four-day festival at Hong Kong Stadium in Hong Kong. At the time, I didn’t know who Franklin or Billy Graham were, and I wasn’t aware of their connections to Wheaton. Amazed by how jam-packed the auditorium was, I saw that 423,335 people from 800 different churches attended the event. After my experience at the festival, I found out my longtime family friend Jana Hoobler M.A. ’06, who has been teaching ESL (English as a Second Language) for over twenty years in Zhuhai city and Macau in China, was a Wheaton graduate. That’s how I heard of Wheaton for the very first time.

Coming from a journalism background at a small private Christian university in Indiana, I never once thought about coming to Wheaton until my junior year, when one of my professors  presented the top three TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) programs in the nation, which included Wheaton. Later on, I took my TESOL class about listening and speaking with professor Virginia Clough Yang M.A. ’11, who also went through the TESOL program at Wheaton. Next thing I knew, I made my decision to apply. 

I love Wheaton not only because it offers one of the best TESOL programs in the nation, but I also love the fact that we get to celebrate cultural diversity. I get to interact with people from all over the world—whether they are from Nigeria, South Africa, Zambia, Brazil, or Mongolia. They have shown me a world of excitement, mystery, and uniqueness.   

I also I appreciate how TESOL applies educational theories into everyday life. By listening to Dr. Alan Seaman and his experiences in Southeast Asia, Dr. Cheri Pierson and her Ph.D. studies in Europe, and Dr. Pam Barger’s upbringing in Chicagoland, what I am learning is more than just how to teach—I also learn what to teach, whether it is using technology or books, social media or print media. 

I love Wheaton not only because I can further my education, but also because I get to grow in Christ. I am starting to see and understand that we are all parts of God’s ministry. God has planned everything one step ahead for me. He knows Wheaton is the right place for me to equip myself physically and spiritually. Seeing all the opportunities ahead of me with organizations like World Relief, ELIC, Wycliffe, Pui Tak Center, and other resources in the greater Chicago area, I am excited to explore a career that can blend TESOL and journalism together. 

Natasha Zeng M.A. ’16 is a student from Zhuhai, China, studying intercultural studies and TESOL at Wheaton College Graduate School. Photo captions (from top): A group from the English Language Institute of China (ELIC) came to study at Wheaton College Graduate School during summer 2015; Every year, Wheaton’s TESOL department offers a field trip to Little India, Chicago. In fall 2015, the group went to South Asian Friendship center and went for Pakistani food; Wheaton’s TESOL department provides a variety of internship opportunities based in Chicago.

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